Tuesday, May 03, 2016

Alex & Freener

Several evenings ago I hosted a family dinner. Someone told a story about a missed opportunity (I can't remember the details). Without prompting, my eleven-year-old grandson, Lachlan, said, "Too late, I've done promised Freener!" My cousin, Lee, who was visiting from Virginia, looked at me with a quizzical eye.

It was an opportunity to share another Ocracoke Island story.

I had been told that in the late 1800s Ocracoke native, Alexander Garrish, fell in love with a young woman. When he asked for her hand in marriage she turned him down.  She refused his offer several times, and he finally quit asking. In the meanwhile, Epherena ("Freener") Fulcher had set her sights on Alexander, and let him know she wanted to marry him. Alexander put Freener off twice. The third time Alexander claimed he had a toothache. Freener is reported to have said, “Heat a brick and put it to his jaw. It’s now or never.”  

Shortly thereafter the first young woman decided she would accept Alexander's proposal. "Too late," Alexander is reported to have said, "I’ve done promised Freener."




















This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is Allie (Teenie) Scott's 1968 story of Simon Garrish, Jr. and the US Life-Saving horse, Sambo. You can read it by clicking here: www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042116.htm

Monday, May 02, 2016

Portsmouth

Just a few photos from Saturday's Portsmouth Island Homecoming celebration.

Church Steeple from the Schoolhouse Path

Washington Roberts House (ca. 1850)

Interior of Roberts House

Henry Pigot's House

Hymn Sing in the Church

Schoolhouse

US Life-Saving Station













































































Several hundred people attended, including many descendants of historic Portsmouth Island families.  And the island was blessedly free of mosquitoes!

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is Allie (Teenie) Scott's 1968 story of Simon Garrish, Jr. and the US Life-Saving horse, Sambo. You can read it by clicking here: www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042116.htm.

Friday, April 29, 2016

How Times Have Changed!

I was in Blackbeard's Lodge the other day and spied this whimsical sign:













It reminded me of a story that Fred Mallison relates in his book To Ocracoke!. He writes about visiting Ocracoke in the first half of the 20th century. On page 103 he tells about waiting for mail after the mail boat docked late in the afternoon:

"One lady I knew rode to the post office on one of the beach trucks. She was wearing her bathing suit and sat on the truck while others of her party went in for the mail. Although the lady was wrapped in a big beach towel over her bathing suit, Mrs. Howard [Ms. Bessie, the postmaster's wife] thought she was dressed improperly, and threatened to pour boiling water on her if she tried to come in."

I wonder what Ms. Bessie would think if she could see how some summer folks dress in public today!

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is Allie (Teenie) Scott's 1968 story of Simon Garrish, Jr. and the US Life-Saving horse, Sambo. You can read it by clicking here: www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042116.htm.

Thursday, April 28, 2016

Stanley Wahab

From the January 30, 1984, issue of the Ocracoke Island News:

"Ocracoke has seen a lot of progress in the last decade. One person who has helped bring progress and modernization to the island was Stanley Wahab (1888-1967)



















"In the late 1930s Stanley built the Wahab Village Hotel in hopes of bringing the tourist trade to Ocracoke.













"This hotel still stands today as Blackbeard's Lodge. Stanley used one wing of the Wahab Village as a roller skating rink. Another wing was converted into a movie theater."

Click here for more information about Stanley Wahab: http://villagecraftsmen.blogspot.com/2013/06/diploma.html.

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is Allie (Teenie) Scott's 1968 story of Simon Garrish, Jr. and the US Life-Saving horse, Sambo. You can read it by clicking here: www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042116.htm.

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Bridge Parts?

Last week Amy and I were looking for seashells when we spied a strange shape out in the ocean. What looked like three tall masts or pilings loomed above the horizon. It was clearly not a sailing ship, but it took a few minutes to venture a guess that it was a section of the new Oregon Inlet bridge, now under construction, being towed to the work site.












Amy had her binoculars with her, so we took the following photo through the eye piece. The last photo is a cropped close-up.

































We are not sure this is a structural element of the new bridge, but we think so. At any rate, we'd never before seen anything quite that that out in the ocean.

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is Allie (Teenie) Scott's 1968 story of Simon Garrish, Jr. and the US Life-Saving horse, Sambo. You can read it by clicking here: www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042116.htm.

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Do Not Feed the Ducks!

They are cute...especially the little ones. But they can be a nuisance for home owners and business owners. We are talking about ducks.

















In recent years hundreds of mallards have taken up permanent residence in Ocracoke village. Although mallards are protected as migratory waterfowl, these critters are in no hurry to go anywhere, at least not as long as people feed them.

Please Do Not Feed the Ducks!

Feeding them is not good for the ducks...it is not good for residents & visitors...and it is not good for Ocracoke. Feeding the ducks, thereby interrupting their natural migratory instincts, leaves the ducks vulnerable to parasites, disease and death by automobiles. They are much healthier, and live longer, in the wild.

Here is some excellent information from Duck Arm-Y:

"Feeding native ducks is not necessary. They have wings and can fly to find food. Bread and other processed food kills ducks. They die of disease and malnutrition. Lettuce is NOT an appropriate food for ducks. ...A fed duck is a DEAD duck.

"Wild ducks need to eat the green foods that grow naturally in their environment in order to maintain good health and a normal lifespan. Their ability to fly and retain natural instincts for survival depends entirely on the foods they eat. By feeding wild (or dumped domestic ducks) you are contributing to their early death, shortening their lives ten-fold.

"Ducks can literally starve to death if they are fed bread. Bread has no nutritional value for a duck. It is like a human eating cardboard. It fills them up so they don’t look for real food. They die of malnutrition."

For more information, click here: http://outerbanksvoice.com/2016/04/17/ocracoke-group-says-no-to-euthanizing-ducks-crowding-town/.

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is Allie (Teenie) Scott's 1968 story of Simon Garrish, Jr. and the US Life-Saving horse, Sambo. You can read it by clicking here: www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042116.htm.

Monday, April 25, 2016

Rainbow

On Saturday, as we were enjoying conversation after our evening meal, Lachlan came running into the house announcing a rainbow forming in the east. David made this panoramic photo to share with our readers. 


Click on the photo to view a larger image.

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is Allie (Teenie) Scott's 1968 story of Simon Garrish, Jr. and the US Life-Saving horse, Sambo. You can read it by clicking here: www.villagecraftsmen.com/news042116.htm.