Monday, March 02, 2015

Womanless Wedding

A favorite fund-raising event for civic organizations in North Carolina and other southern states in the first half of the twentieth century was the Womanless Wedding. Community members came out to see their friends and neighbors starring in a mock wedding. All of the participants...including the bride and all of her attendants (even the mother of the bride) were men.

This first photo, probably from the mid-1950s, is of a Womanless Wedding on Ocracoke. It is part of the Billy Ely Collection at the Ocracoke Preservation Society. I think the bride is Chris Gaskill, and the groom, Calvin O'Neal, but I'm not sure. Are there any islanders who can identify these folks?














This next photo was taken just before our re-enactment of a Womanless Wedding in the 2011 July 4th Parade. Any idea who these folks are?













If the Ocracoke Civic & Business Association ever sponsors another Ocracoke Womanless Wedding I will be sure to let you all know.

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is research into the origin of the Ocracoke Island Wahab family. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news022115.htm.

Friday, February 27, 2015

In the Country of Ocracoke

In 1994 an island resident compiled a list of 20 observations she thought important to share with island visitors. It was titled "In the Country of Ocracoke." Here is number 3:

"If you're riding along in your car (slowly, please) and you see a car, or more probably a pickup truck, stopped in the lane in front of you and the driver is leisurely conversing with the occupant of a vehicle, most probably another pickup truck, headed toward you in the other lane, please do not honk your horn. Do not lose your patience, or you'll be sent home. Take a deep breath, reach over in the back seat to the cooler of beer you keep there and pop one until traffic clears."

Not much has changed in the last 20 years...except that it's no longer a good idea to "pop one until traffic clears." Our local deputies (and the occasional state trooper on the island) frown on drinking and driving.  

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is research into the origin of the Ocracoke Island Wahab family. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news022115.htm.

Thursday, February 26, 2015

Dale Sanderson

In 1663 & 1665, King Charles II, newly restored to the English throne, appointed eight Lords Proprietors to govern the territory of Carolina (at that time, all of the land between 31° and 36° north latitude, and extending from the Atlantic to the Pacific). In 1719 John Lovick acquired "Occacok" Island as a grant from the Proprietors.

Sometime before 1733 Ocracoke came into the possession of Richard Sanderson, an English sea captain. At Sanderson's death in 1733 the island passed to his son, Richard Sanderson, Jr., who sold it to William Howard, Sr. for £105, in 1759.

256 years later, this man, Dale Sanderson, turned up at my door, offering to buy the island back:

Dale (Sandy) Sanderson
Dale Sanderson is a direct descendant of Richard Sanderson, who sold Ocracoke to William Howard. Dale and his brother only recently discovered their connection to Ocracoke. They live in Colorado, where their family had migrated, after passing through Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Texas.

Dale was on a journey tracing his family roots. We had a delightful time sharing family history, and touring Ocracoke. 

Capt. Rob Temple stopped by to interview Dale, who goes by the nickname, Sandy. You can read Rob's delightful article in the Ocracoke Current: http://www.ocracokecurrent.com/107262.

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is research into the origin of the Ocracoke Island Wahab family. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news022115.htm

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Yesterday's Snow

I thought our readers (especially those not on Facebook) would enjoy a few photos from yesterday.

Ocracoke Lighthouse

Springer's Point

Another Lighthouse View

Snow-covered Dunes

Snow on the Beach
Dale Sanderson on Howard Street























































































This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is research into the origin of the Ocracoke Island Wahab family. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news022115.htm.

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Pony Cart

I recently came across this vintage photo. It shows a typical mode of Ocracoke Island transportation before the advent of automobiles and paved roads.












Most people walked where they needed to go. Some went by horseback. But the two-wheeled pony cart proved to be a convenient way to travel, especially if there was a load to haul, a distance to go, or passengers to carry.

I am not sure who the people in this photo are, but this image, the best picture of an island pony cart that I am aware of, is part of the Ocracoke Preservation Society, Mary Ruth Dixon Collection. Many thanks to OPS and Mary Ruth for permission to share the picture.

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is research into the origin of the Ocracoke Island Wahab family. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news022115.htm

Monday, February 23, 2015

Island Inn Slaves

Here is another photo that Chester Lynn shared with me from years ago -- a scene from one of the July 4th Parades.













Pictured above, on their float, "Island Inn Slaves," are Grace Gaskill, Lydia Frieda Spencer, Betsy Anna Midgette, and Chester Lynn (the Island Inn restaurant manager). Chester now owns and operates Annabelle's Florist & Antique Shop on the Back Road. Stop by and pay him a visit (tell him you saw his photo on the Ocracoke Journal).

This month's Ocracoke Newsletter is research into the origin of the Ocracoke Island Wahab family. You can read the article here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news022115.htm.

Friday, February 20, 2015

The Wahabs of Ocracoke Island

We have published another Ocracoke Newsletter. This month's article is about the Wahab family of Ocracoke, and research about their origins...Arab or Scotch-Irish?

You can read the current Newsletter here: http://www.villagecraftsmen.com/news022115.htm.